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Journal #7 ANA Code of Ethics

Posted by: | June 18, 2012 | 61 Comments |

Where can you find a copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics? Please review and pick one of the 9 provisions that is important to you.  How are you going to emulate this in your practice? Give 3 examples.

Responses due by Sunday midnight, June 24. Relevent information expressed in at least 100 words for your response (10pts.)and a comments on at least 2 fellow students blog (5 pts ea).

 

 

under: Journals

61 Comments

  1. By: Shelanda Brown on June 19, 2012 at 1:05 AM      Reply

    The ana code of ethics can be found on this website http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx.
    A provision that is important to me is provision number one. Provision number one states: The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion andrespect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual,unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personalattributes, or the nature of health problems. One way I will emulate this in my practice is by respecting not only the client but all members of the healthcare team. For example, I will not belittle those who work under me. Secondly, I will emulate this by providing the best care that I can to all clients reguardless of economic status, race, or any other way. For example, I come to work one client is client is a hard working woman who has worked her way to the top very pleasant . The other is a homeless drug addict that is grumpy but cooperative. I will do my best for both I wont withhold care from either one of them care because of these reasons. Final I will honor the clients wishes and respect their right to make decisions for them self. For example I have a client that is alert and oriented that refuses to take a medication. After asking why they are refusing and ensuring the understand what the medication is, I will accept that and document the refusal.
    In Nursing we have the oppurtunity to meet so many other people that are different from ourselves . So we must work hard to develop and keep a therapuetic relationship. Communication can make or break any relationship.

    • By: Lucinda on June 19, 2012 at 12:15 PM      Reply

      I agree that every person deserves the same care no matter what their economic status is. They should not have care be withheld because they are homeless. We need to have compassion for everyone.

    • By: Sandy on June 19, 2012 at 1:50 PM      Reply

      Shelanda, I especially like how you ended by saying that, “In Nursing we have the oppurtunity to meet so many other people that are different from ourselves . So we must work hard to develop and keep a therapuetic relationship.” So true! Great post!

    • By: Pandora on June 19, 2012 at 11:05 PM      Reply

      Shelanda, you make a good point.
      It all boils down to who has the best customer service. Respect is due to a dog. In me saying this, animals have rights just as people do. Sometimes people get so disgusted with certain issues and loose interest. Respect is equality and should always be the center of development of care and shouldn’t be forgotten.

    • By: Dianna on June 23, 2012 at 4:14 PM      Reply

      Shelanda,
      I agree with you. We as nurses meet alot of different types of people. We need to help them and not judge them because they may be different or have different values. Our job is to give them the best care possible no matter what. The nurse is who they, the patient, judge their quality of care they received in the hospital on.

  2. By: Lucinda on June 19, 2012 at 12:10 PM      Reply

    American Nurses Association Code of Ethics can be found at this website: http://www.nursingworld.org/Mobile/Code-of-Ethics. One of the provisions that are important to me is Provision 1. It states the nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems. One way I plan to emulate this into my practice is by providing good care to every individual regardless of their economic status. For example, I will provide the same care to a wealthy man as I would a homeless man. Another way I plan to emulate this is by showing compassion to every client. For example, I will show the same compassion to a person who contracted AIDS by an infected needle or a baby who has AIDS due to contracting it from his mother. Another way I plan to emulate this is by giving the same care to individuals regardless of their personality. For example, I would treat a person who was hateful and rude with the same compassion as I would a person who was nice and cooperative.

    • By: Sandy on June 19, 2012 at 1:54 PM      Reply

      Lucinda, I agree with you that everyone deserves the same care and hope that as new nurses we can all remember this in our practice. It is so sad to see the “expierenced” nurses in the field forget this aspect.

      • By: julia on June 19, 2012 at 6:05 PM      Reply

        Sandy,
        I agree with your comment regarding the nurses that seem to “forget” to offer non discriminating care. However, I don’t think it is always easy to do, even for the most honorable of nurses. In situations that tug at our heart strings, our attitudes towards our patients tend to reflect our feelings. I think it is important to have someone to talk to about our own internal strife. It takes a very strong person to be able to convey a caring and professional attitude while feeling angry, judgemental, or disapproving of a patient. Years of stuffing and internalizing feelings can create resentment, disgust, anger, “ineffective coping”, and depression. All of those internal feelings are then reflected in our eyes, and through our care, whether we realize it or not. We as new nurses need to stay proactive regarding our own spiritual and physical needs, so that we are not the burned out nurses class 53 blogs about. ;)

    • By: Shelanda Brown on June 19, 2012 at 10:08 PM      Reply

      I loved your post. As a nurse the care you provide is your portfolio sort of speak. To sit around a give care based on prejudgements and biasis would say alot about a person. We are all different we come from different walks of life. This means that we have a responsibility to approach the care of our clients in a none judgemental way. There are alot of people that don’t seek healthcare because of the way they were treated at one point in there life. There is a quote that says, “They may not Remeber your name but they will remember how you made them feel.” And it’s TRUE. Also what goes around comes around.

    • By: Shay on June 23, 2012 at 10:52 PM      Reply

      It is tough to say that I will always treat every patient with the same compassion to be perfectly honest. I can imagine a few situations where I would probably ask for a different assignment. It is not realistic to think, that in my entire nursing career, I will never run across a patient that I could not feel compassion for. I expect that being a professional majority of the time I will “man up” and have compassion, however I am sure their will be an exception or two through out my career. Some people just do not want to be helped they can be nasty and mean and some have done horrific things in their life. I think it is more important as a nursing professional to realize your personal and professional boundaries and know what you can or will deal with. This will assure the best care for all patients. You cannot pretend to be compassionate and if you run across that one person that completely rubs you the wrong way for whatever reason, I think it is best to just take a different assignment.

  3. By: Sandy on June 19, 2012 at 1:45 PM      Reply

    I found the ANA code of ethics on this website: http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx.
    A feel all the provisions are important, but the one that I chose is provision number one which states: The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.
    Emulating into practice will be to treat all patients with respect no matter what they have encountered prior to their visit whether rich or poor, addict or not, HIV infected vs. the common cold, I will treat them with compassion, respect, and without prejudice.
    Ref. http://www.nursingworld.org

    • By: Melissa on June 19, 2012 at 5:56 PM      Reply

      Sandy, I agree, we as nurses need to treat all of our patients with compassion, respect and without prejudice no matter what sort of background they have. Great post.

    • By: Lucinda on June 19, 2012 at 9:47 PM      Reply

      I also agree with you that we need to treat all of our patients with compassion no matter where they come from. They all deserve to be treated with respect.

    • By: Emily on June 23, 2012 at 3:49 PM      Reply

      I also agree with you Sandy, that the first provision is very important when it comes to a standard of care. We cannot discriminate because of differences. All of our patients, although unique, must be given the same standard of care. I like that you listed polar opposite conditions or economic statuses, because it is true that we all will take care of these types of people throughout our career. Being able to keep our judgments in check is the key.

  4. By: Sandy on June 19, 2012 at 1:49 PM      Reply

    Shelanda, I especially like how you ended by saying that, “In Nursing we have the oppurtunity to meet so many other people that are different from ourselves . So we must work hard to develop and keep a therapuetic relationship.” So true! Great post!

    • By: Sandy on June 19, 2012 at 1:51 PM      Reply

      OOPS! Should have posted as a reply to Shelanda
      Sorry!!!

  5. By: julia on June 19, 2012 at 5:46 PM      Reply

    The code of ethics can be found at http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/2110Provisions.html. After reading the nine provisions, I think “The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community” is all encompassing. While I do agree with earlier posts in regards to provision one, I think the second one is a simpler way to say the same thing. If I always remember the patient comes first, the other issues should fall within that. I am going to work hard to make sure I always put the patient first by 1) asking the patient what is important to them during their stay, 2) asking the patient about cultural preferences and doing everything I can to accomodate that patient, even when my beliefs are different, and 3) providing care in a non-judgmental way regardless of race or financial situation. It is not my job to judge another person because of their situation. It is my job

    • By: julia on June 19, 2012 at 5:48 PM      Reply

      disregard the last “it is my job” – woops!

    • By: Melissa on June 19, 2012 at 6:01 PM      Reply

      Julia,
      I myself, thought provision 2 is important. Asking patients what is important to them during their stay is a great idea. I too agree that cultural preference is very important. Providing care in a non judgmental way regardless of their history is so very crucial!
      Great post!!

    • By: Shelanda Brown on June 19, 2012 at 10:28 PM      Reply

      Definitely important to remember Patient Centered Care afterall. Great post!

    • By: Shanna on June 23, 2012 at 9:08 AM      Reply

      Jules- I think asking a patient what is important to them- seems so obvious but we dont really see it done that often. I think it is a great question that allows the patient to feel that they are in fact a participant in their own care. I think you should keep the “it is my job” even if it was a “whoops”- it is like a Freudian slip… because it really is our job…

  6. By: Melissa on June 19, 2012 at 5:53 PM      Reply

    I found a copy of the ANA Code of Ethics on this website:
    http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics.
    After reading all nine of these provisions, I realized they are all very important. The one I personally found the most important to me, is provision number 2. Provision number 2 states: “The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community.” I find this provision the most important because the nurse’s primary commitment is always to the patient first. 1.) I will provide my patient’s with having them participate in their plan of care, 2) I will make sure my patient’s find their plan acceptable. Sometimes the patient’s wishes don’t always correlate with the family’s wishes; 3) I will try to help resolve the conflict. If conflict still continues my commitment will remain with the patient.
    References: Nursing world. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics

    • By: Pandora on June 19, 2012 at 11:24 PM      Reply

      Melissa, I like the way you interpreted your selection. Many times nurse have to deal with family members, sometimes they are pleasant; but most of the time they are not. This is not of concern. Concentrate on the priority, the patient and the other solutions will resolve.

    • By: Emily on June 23, 2012 at 3:45 PM      Reply

      Melissa, I think this is a very important provision. So many times, we are not just caring for one single individual. We are either dealing with a spouse, a parent, or multiple family members. I think this provision also brings up a good point that sometimes your patient is the whole community. Community nurses treat a population of people. Regardless of the number, the priority is always the patient.

    • By: Dianna on June 23, 2012 at 4:19 PM      Reply

      Melissa
      I think that you have reminded us that we are not always caring for just the patient. It may be the whole family or community too. We have to sometimes adjust our frame of thinking when caring for them. But whether treating one, the family, or the community, the main person is always the patiet.

  7. By: Pandora on June 19, 2012 at 11:09 PM      Reply

    Shelanda, you made a good point.
    Respect is due to a dog. In generally speaking people tend to vere away from equality thinking one is better than the other, but in nursing everyone is treated the same. It is our call of duty to provide the maximum care as possible.

  8. By: Pandora on June 20, 2012 at 10:56 AM      Reply

    The ANA code of ethics #9 seems to grab my attention. It states, “The nurse collaborates with other healthcare professionals and the public in promoting community, national, and international efforts to meet health neeeds.” We as nurses have the power to help heal the sick, in part, there must be a group effort. The diseases that effect people in our country and other countries are the same, but we have technology that is well-advanced in which some do not. The nurse who spends most of time by bedside should be able to collaborate with DR.’s and Specialists and etc., to help in the healing process. It has to be a team effort, noone person can do this alone.
    One example, is on assessment of my patient; be persistent in relaying information that is pertinent in regards to an altered status of the patient. This information given adequately to the HCP will expedite treatment and decrease episodes of complications. Second, provide community workshops or health screenings. Many people do not like to go to the hospital, so let the mini hospital come to them. Third, we need to reach out to other countries about their epidemics and healthcare treatment; because the United States has immigrants and traveler’s from all over the world and it certain health statuses and unknown; there may not be a way to pinpoint of origin a healthcare crisis.
    Indeed, nurses’s are considered the middle-man/woman in the healthcare setting, however quite knowledgeable. To expand the horizon, mediate between HCP, and aid in expected outcomes. The ANA code of ethics does help trend the generation and guide nursing in the right direction: a team approach.

    • By: Pandora on June 20, 2012 at 10:59 AM      Reply

      http://www.sfcc.edu/files/sfcc_NursingStudentHandbook_Fall2011.pdf

    • By: julia on June 20, 2012 at 3:10 PM      Reply

      Pandora,
      Your post is excellent. It brings to mind an old saying, “It takes a village to raise a child”. While I do not feel that patients should be treated as children, I always try to look at the patient as MY child. Even if that patient is 95, he or she is someone’s child. I hope that one day when I am gone, someone is there to care for my children the way I would. Since no one can do it alone, we are reminded by your post that teamwork is a critical part of care.

    • By: Shanna on June 23, 2012 at 8:46 AM      Reply

      Pandora
      I think you are 100% right- collaboration is at the cornerstone of nursing. Working together on behalf of the patient and keeping the lines of communication open will be all inclusive and client-centered. We are not only the “middle-men” but we are the one that sees more of that patient than anyone else. We are the “first line of defense”- (Shay). Great post as always Pandora.

  9. By: Shanna on June 23, 2012 at 9:01 AM      Reply

    The Code of Ethics can be found on the American Nurses Association website: http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics. Of the nine provisions, I found the fifth to be interesting and important to our profession- it reads “The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, and to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth.” I think it encompasses what we do- as nurses yes, but also as people. Incorporating this into daily practice is imperative and can be done by establishing a value system- and having time for self-reflection. We don’t have to agree or disagree but we need to be aware of our own feelings towards a certain issue and explore those to ensure we don’t inflict our beliefs onto our patients. We maintain competence by acknowledging that there is always something to learn, and always courses or materials that can expand our knowledge base. And by recognizing that as much as we are in a position to change the lives of our patients, they too change ours- it is through our encounters that we grow. We owe it to our patients, the health care community and ourselves to avoid stagnancy and constantly keep improving, growing and learning.

  10. By: Emily on June 23, 2012 at 3:06 PM      Reply

    You can find the Code of Ethics for Nurses on many different websites and books, however, I like reading about the ANA so I found it at: http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/2110Provisions.html

    I think the provision that stands out to me is provision number one. This states, “The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.”

    To me, this provision really encompasses the whole essence of the nursing profession. It is our duty to deliver compassionate care to our patients and respect them for who they are, despite our personal feelings. Although emotional, nursing is a profession which means professionalism must be maintained at all times.

    At times, I’m sure this will be difficult to not let my personal beliefs or thoughts interfere with my job. However, I know I can do this because I already have come into contact with this at work. Whenever I have a patient that the doctor’s have already labeled, “drug seeking” I do not let that impair my judgment of their character, or the standard of care I provide to them. I think another way to guarantee that you will always provide compassionate care, no matter what, is to think of the patient as one of your family members. How would you want a nurse to treat your own mother? Would you want someone to deny her care or treat her poorly because she is going through a hard time, and got laid off from her job? Life is hard, and if we remember that our patient’s are human beings who have gone through trials and controversy like everyone in life, we should always be able to give the same standard of compassionate, judgment free care to each patient.

    Reference: http://www.nursingworld.org

    • By: Irene on June 23, 2012 at 8:31 PM      Reply

      Emily,
      I really liked your statement about thinking of the patient as one of your family members. Going into the healthcare field, we want to help those that need help no matter what. A human is a live, breathing person. You can’t turn someone away just because you don’t like something about them. It is our job and duty to provide everyone with respect and compassionate care. Great job!

    • By: Angela on June 24, 2012 at 6:09 PM      Reply

      I feel that you are right Emily. You can not let other people’s judgment impair your own. Regardless of that person’s decisions or their past you have made an oath to take care of the clients in the hospital so you have to keep that oath. Just like Irene says our clients are living breathing humans and deserve all the care they can get.

  11. By: Dianna on June 23, 2012 at 4:29 PM      Reply

    I went on to the American Nurses Association website and found the code of ethics listed. After reading all 9 of the provisions, the one I chose was number 4. It states, ” the nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.”
    To emulate this provision I will question any orders that I feel are unsafe, or do not seem correct when applied to my patient. The second thing I will do is to make sure that my patient is in the safest environment possible to maintain their health. The third thing that I can do is to be an advocate for my patient whether I agree with their decisions or not. When all is said and done I am their for my client.

    • By: Irene on June 23, 2012 at 8:27 PM      Reply

      I too picked this one! It is very important in patient care settings to practice this. I liked your comment I am there for my patient! If we don’t take care of them and makes sure everything is being done to better their health and safety who will?!

    • By: Shay on June 23, 2012 at 10:39 PM      Reply

      That is really great to hear Diana. Being a patient Advocate. A lot of people have a hard time excepting the fact that their patient’s choices may not always be what we as nurses would have chosen. I applaud you for backing your patients.

    • By: Lisa on June 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM      Reply

      I agree Diana maintaing a safe environment for the patient and being a voice for them is key in providing quality care for them

  12. By: Irene on June 23, 2012 at 8:23 PM      Reply

    A copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics can be found at http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics.
    The provision I liked the most was number 3 which states “The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.” This is the priority in healthcare. The patients put their trust in the nurses. They are ones who see them daily and have the most interaction with them. It is our duty to follow this provision heavily. I am going to emulate this in my practice by keeping the patient’s information confidential, unless otherwise informed by the patient to share their info with someone. Also, if I feel any treatment or orders are not appropriate for the patient I will question them. More than likely I will get yelled at by a MD, but at least they will be aware that something might not be right and look into it. A third thing I will do is report any impaired team member. There is no way they can take care of patients while under the influence. Not only as a nurse, but as an individual, I can’t let someone be responsible for another’s life knowing that they are strung out on drugs. There is no way I will knowingly allow anyone to but another’s life in jeopardy like that.

    • By: Kayla on June 24, 2012 at 5:15 PM      Reply

      You brought up many great points Irene and I do feel this is a very important provision as well, I think they all are important. But you are right about us being trusted by the patients and that it is very important for us to maintain that trust. As the guest speaker informed us in class, nurses are the number one person our society trusts, that is huge.

      • By: Kira on June 24, 2012 at 6:30 PM      Reply

        I agree that this is an important provision we are our clients biggest advocates. We spend the most time with them and we are their last line of defense. It is up to use to maintian the standard of care need to help our clients. We have to be will to go the extra mile needed to help them.

  13. By: Shay on June 23, 2012 at 10:35 PM      Reply

    Here is the website for the Codes.
    http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx
    Number five stood out to me; Professional growth and maintenance. It is easy or so I hear to become complacent after working for many years in any profession. This is especially true in nursing due to the high demands the profession places on individuals. After working twelve plus hours, times three to four shifts a week multiply that over fifteen years, it is easy to see that one may not want to read about or even discus nursing on their down time. However this is where nurses have to stay diligent in staying motivated in their career, for the safety of their patients. Whatever it takes to accomplish this is what nurses should do; vacations, spa days, a relaxing day off at least once a week. Also yearly goals regarding continued education will help any professional stay focused. Reminiscing is an important factor in growth and nurses should give themselves time to do so. It helps the nurse take into consideration their accomplishments and their strife’s. Reflecting gives the nurse time to organize her thoughts and realize how to handle situations and daily events. It is a time for critiquing and growth in one’s personal life and profession. I will personally implement all of these in my future as a nurse.

    • By: Lisa on June 24, 2012 at 12:06 PM      Reply

      good point Shay, it is important for the nurse to remember to take care of her/himself so that they can continue to provide safe quality care to their patients. “If you cant take care of yourself, you cant take care of others”.

    • By: Angela on June 24, 2012 at 6:00 PM      Reply

      I agree with your article Shay. Many nurses who work 40+ hours a week most likely will not want to discuss nursing. I believe all nurses should take some time to theirselves and have a relaxing a day so they do no get burned out. Great article!

  14. By: Lisa on June 24, 2012 at 11:40 AM      Reply

    A copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics can be found at http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.pdf . One of the provisions that is important to me is provision 5 that states; The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth. I plan to emulate this by going back to school for my bachelors degree in nursing and attending continuing education classes, maintaining integrity by not falsifying records and keeping my patients information private, and maintaining a wholeness of character by keeping an open mind and remaining non judgmental towards all of my patients.

    • By: Kayla on June 24, 2012 at 5:12 PM      Reply

      I also find that provision to be very important because we need to remember and take care of ourselves as we do the patients. I as well plan to continue on to my bachelors one day and I agree that it is important for us, as nurses, to be open-minded because we will come across a variety of things dealing with people on a daily basis, which we may not agree with it all, but it is not our job, in any way shape or form, to be judgmental.

  15. By: Kayla on June 24, 2012 at 5:08 PM      Reply

    I found a copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics at the website http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx. The provision I value most is provision 1 which states, “The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems”. I will emulate this in my nursing practice by respecting my clients as well as all members of my health care team, such as doctors, fellow nurses and assistive personnel. A second way I will include this is my practice is to treat all patients equally with respect and compassion no matter their race, economic status or personality; for example I will treat a rich person the same as I would a homeless person. And lastly, I will not judge a person based upon their health problem and will treat them with respect and compassion like any other of my patients; for example I will treat a person with AIDs the same as a person coming in for general surgery or with the flu.

    • By: Kira on June 24, 2012 at 6:24 PM      Reply

      You are right everyone we work with and take care of should be treated fairly and with respect. It helps us do better as individuals and this also helps to maintian the standard of care the the nursing profesion requires.

    • By: Emily Killingsworth on June 24, 2012 at 8:54 PM      Reply

      I agree with you about treating everyone we cross paths with in the health are as equals but we all know that there are so many nurses, doctors, AP that do not do this. It is sad and maybe they should question the reason they are in this profession. The only way to change this would be to lead by example and everyone in our class are going to be such wonderful examples of such. Well put Kayla.

  16. By: Kira on June 24, 2012 at 6:15 PM      Reply

    A copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics can be found on the American Nurses Association website. http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics Right now I would consider provision 4 to the most important because right now we are building the foundation which our entire individual nursing practice will be based upon. According to provision 4, “The nurse is responsible and accountable for individual nursing practice and determines the appropriate delegation of the tasks consistent with the nurse’s obligation to provide optimum care.” Three ways in which can incorporate provision 4 include firstly making sure my nursing actions are within my scope of nursing. An example of this is performing tasks that my educational level permits using consults and getting assistance with the tasks that are beyond my scope. The second way delegating tasks to others that are within their scope of nursing, such as delegating vitals to assistive personal and not delegating any assessment duties. The third way is making sure that I’m accountable for all my actions. In order to do this I would always have to be honest and disclosure all my actions used in the care of my clients.

    • By: Veronica on June 24, 2012 at 8:26 PM      Reply

      Kira, I couldn’t agree with you more. Too many times people get into more trouble by trying to work out of thier scope then if they would have just spoke up in the first place, safety is a huge priority and if a nurse is working out of thier scope of practice the only one that could possibly pay the ultimate price would be the patient. By speaking up you are not only be honest with yourself, you are ensuring that all patients recieve the care they need.

  17. By: Angela on June 24, 2012 at 6:50 PM      Reply

    I went to this website and found the code of ethics http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.aspx

    The provision that I value most is provision 2. The nurse’s primary commitment is to the recipient of nursing and healthcare services—the patient—whether the recipient is an individual, a family, a group, or a community. The nurse strives to provide patients with opportunities to participate in planning care, assures that patients find the plans acceptable and supports the implementation of the plan. I believe that no matter what a nurses places their client first and foremost. Nurses should actively promote the collaborative multi-disciplinary planning required to ensure the availability and accessibility of quality health services to all persons who have needs for health care. Nurses are leaders and vigilant advocates for the delivery of dignified and humane care.

    • By: Veronica on June 24, 2012 at 8:22 PM      Reply

      Angela, your statement in nurses are the leaders and vibilant advocates for the delivery of dignified and humane care is so true and important. So many times people loose why they went into the field. If we can not speak for our patients who will.

    • By: Emily Killingsworth on June 24, 2012 at 8:50 PM      Reply

      I chose this provision as well. I agree with you as well with Veronica. We go into this profession for one reason, to take care of people. If putting patients first is not the primary reason why we are in nursing, then suppose we should reconsider why we are doing it in the first place.

  18. By: Veronica on June 24, 2012 at 8:14 PM      Reply

    The ANA Code of Ethics can be found on NursingWorld.org
    I have a difficult time choosing one provision, while all of the provisions are important 1,2,3 and 6 speak to me the most. But in choosing only one I will have to go with provision number 3 because it states that “The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient” under 3.5 it state “The nurse’s primary commitment is to the health, well-being, and safety of the patient across the life span and in all settings in which health care needs are addressed”. I believe as nurses we need to make sure our patients well-being is protected above all. Quality, care and the right for all patients to be treated equally is an important aspect in the values of nursing. I will strive to ensure that my patients rights are always heard, when a patient is not able to speak for themselves I will strive to help them have a voice. I will strive to make sure all patients are provide with safe appropriate health care and question any procedure that is not valid. If I ever come across a situation where I believe the patients best intrest are not being met or a nurse or other health care professional is not upholding the code of ethics I will use the proper channels to ensure the patients come first in safety, health and integrity. Nurses are the most trusted individuals in the health care team and I will strive to uphold that trust in everything I do.

    • By: Veronica on June 24, 2012 at 8:16 PM      Reply

      Reference:
      http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.pdf

    • By: Kim P. on June 24, 2012 at 11:46 PM      Reply

      I agree with you about making sure the patient’s best interests are being met using the proper channels to ensure they will be. I think it takes a lot of bravery to be a nurse. It is not only being sure in yourself knowing what is right, but having the courage to follow through with what you know is right. Sometimes, it is hard to know what the right thing to do IS though.

  19. By: Emily Killingsworth on June 24, 2012 at 8:46 PM      Reply

    A copy of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics can be found on this website: http://www.nursingworld.org/codeofethics.

    The one provision that stood out to me is provision number two: The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group or community. I suppose that the majority of nurses chose this profession for one major reason, to help people. I know this is why I chose nursing. So having the primary commitment of taking care of patients makes a lot of sense. One way I would emulate this in my practice is time management/organization. While maintaining a structured time management schedule and staying well organized, it will help me to better take care of my patients and be able to organize my day to day tasks and making sure things are done in a timely manner. Another way to emulate this provision in my practice is to continue my education and to stay up to date with continuing certifications and technology. This will help me to become a better nurse and therefore be able to better take care of my patients. One of the last ways to emulate this provision in my practice is staying true to myself and question anything and everything that I do not feel right about. Being an advocate for each one of my patients is a great way of staying committed to them.

    • By: Kim P. on June 24, 2012 at 11:51 PM      Reply

      Questioning seems like it would be something that would be hard for some people to do. Several people have mentioned patient advocacy. Thinking about standing up for people who cannot stand up for themselves just gives me this feeling of pride in the choice I’ve made in becoming a nurse. I like your post.

  20. By: Kim P. on June 24, 2012 at 11:40 PM      Reply

    After a brief google search, I found a pdf version of the ANA code of ethics with Interpretive Statements. http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics.pdf
    You can also purchase one at http://www.nursesbooks.org/Main-Menu/Ethics/Code-of-Ethics-for-Nurses-With-Interpretive-Statements.aspx
    Of the nine provisions in the ANA code of Ethics, the first one struck right to my heart. It states, “The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.” That is how I feel, that is why I am a nurse. I will not judge my patients. I will treat them the way they deserve to be treated: fairly. Show love for your fellow human being.

    • By: Kim P. on June 24, 2012 at 11:56 PM      Reply

      I know that there will inevitably be people who will be hard to deal with. I still try to see the good in everyone. I know my heart, but I am only worried about it hardening and becoming enbittered. As a nurse I am sure to see injustices, hopefully I can right some of them.

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